If we were to play Family Feud and be asked the “Top Responses That I Like Least About Moving” — packing would make it onto that list (probably the number 2 answer only to be outdone by unpacking).

The task of packing up all of your earthly belongings can seem pretty darn overwhelming, and on top of that time consuming, too. But as anyone who has moved several times will tell you, the task of packing gets a little easier each time.

I find that it is helpful to take it just one room at a time, starting with the room that I use the least. A friend of mine once revealed his technique of starting in one corner of the room and making a clean, even sweep across it. This helps him to stay organized and not forget any easy-to-miss spots, such as the drawer of pots that is at the bottom of your oven.

Another tip he shared with me is that, while packing, he frequently lifts the bag or box to make sure that it has not become too heavy to carry. Of course, it is also wise to label all of your boxes with the items they contain and the room where they belong, as well as any reminders such as “this end up” and “fragile.”

Any boxes with toiletries and other items with expiration dates should be labeled with “open first” so that they do not get shoved in a corner of your new home (yea right!)

When you relocate across town or maybe even just down the street, it’s not too hard to just load up the back of a pick-up truck or van. But when packing for a long, overseas move – such as aliyah, it is quite a different story.

Here is the best way to pack up your belongings in order to insure that they will safely make it to your new home in Israel (whether you do it yourself or have the movers pack for you):

China:
Wrap each item individually in unprinted paper. Or you can also purchase dish packs, which are reusable pouches specifically designed to keep glass safe while in transit.

Stemware:
First, wrap a bit of plastic or paper around the stem for extra reinforcement. Then wrap the whole glass. Place each one upside-down in a partitioned box.

Mirrors and framed artwork:
First, use removable masking tape to mark a big “X” in the center of the glass. This helps to make it less susceptible to breakage. Then wrap the whole piece in a generous amount of packing paper. You can stack mirrors and artwork using Styrofoam corner rounds that create space between each item.

Lampshades:
Separate shades from their lamps, handling the shades only by their wire frames. Place the shades in large boxes and nest them together, separating them with sheets of paper.

Clothes:
Clothes can be folded and boxed, or for quicker unpacking you can obtain wardrobe boxes that allow you to leave your clothing on their hangers. To take up less space with clothing, tightly roll items rather than folding them.

As another space saver, you can roll fragile items inside t-shirts and sweatshirts. Just make sure to clearly label which clothing items contain other fragile items so that you don’t forget about these items while you are unpacking.

Glass jars, bottle, figurines, antiques, and collectibles:
Wrap each one individually in bubble wrap. Place these in boxes with packing peanuts or crumpled paper between the pieces for extra padding. Look for biodegradable packing peanuts made of cornstarch.

Enjoy watching this video about the Katz family moving to Israel.

Stuart